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nfl expands use of rfid by tagging all footballs

The NFL is extending its use of RFID technology by embedding RFID tags in all footballs used in every game this season. The data will enable the collection of real-time location, speed, and ball rotation data, enabling advanced statistics for broadcasters and viewers. Zebra Technologies says that the analytics enhancements will allow fans to gain […]

Source: http://rfid24-7.com

Scientists Identify New Hosts for Chagas Disease Vectors

Solitary weasel-like animals called tayra might look pretty harmless, but some may actually be incubators for a parasite that causes Chagas disease, a chronic, debilitating condition that is spread by insects called kissing bugs and affects more than 8…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Comprehensive Meta-Analysis Affirms Cranberries Role in Promoting a Healthy Urinary Tract

A thorough review of dozens of studies led scientists to conclude that healthcare professionals should be telling their patients to have cranberry products as a first step in reducing recurrent UTIs. The comprehensive meta-analysis and assessment of hu…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Five African Countries Approach Control of Their HIV Epidemics

Data released today from the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) show that the HIV epidemic is coming under control in Lesotho. These results add to prior PEPFAR-supported Population-based HIV Impact Assessments (PHIAs) announced i…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Asserts Chlorhexidine Not an Essential Component in Alcohol-Based Surgical Hand Preparation

Surgical hand preparation is an essential part of modern surgery. Both alcohol-based and antiseptic detergent-based hand preparation are recommended practices, with a trend toward use of alcohol based handrubs. However, discussion has arisen whether ch…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Tick Saliva May Hold Potential Treatment for Reducing HIV-Linked Heart Disease Risk

Scientists may have found a clue to why people living with HIV have double the likelihood of developing heart disease. The findings, made by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research and National Institutes of Health, also…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Tick Saliva May Hold Potential Treatment for Reducing HIV-Linked Heart Disease Risk

Scientists may have found a clue to why people living with HIV have double the likelihood of developing heart disease. The findings, made by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Center for Vaccine Research and National Institutes of Health, also…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Discover a Way to Slow Viral Replication in the Gastrointestinal Tract

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered a way to slow viral replication in the gastrointestinal tract of people infected by HIV-AIDS. This advance, published in JCI Insight, might well lead to the dev…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Discover a Way to Slow Viral Replication in the Gastrointestinal Tract

Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) have discovered a way to slow viral replication in the gastrointestinal tract of people infected by HIV-AIDS. This advance, published in JCI Insight, might well lead to the dev…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

GW Researcher Awarded $2 Million to Study Natural Immune Response to HIV

A research team at the George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences will study the body’s natural defenses against HIV and look for ways to eliminate the infectious HIV reservoirs in the white blood cells of people tak…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Unlock Potential Pathway to Treat Flesh-Eating Bacteria

Researchers at Houston Methodist have solved a 100-year-old mystery, providing them a possible key to unlock a pathway for treating diseases caused by flesh-eating bacteria. This is timely news, given the current dangers lurking in the debris and destr…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC and Texas Health Officials Warn About Illness Linked to Raw Milk From Texas Dairy

People who consumed raw milk or raw milk products from one Texas dairy should contact their healthcare provider immediately, warn health investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Texas Department of State Health Se…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

One Vaccine Injection Could Carry Many Doses

Microstructures are fabricated by pressing and heating polymer into a patterned PDMS base mold and delaminating these structures onto a substrate to create the first layer. A second layer is then formed using a similar molding process against a Teflon …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Hand Hygiene Science Asking New Questions About Product Volume and Hand Coverage

By Kelly M. Pyrek As hand hygiene-related science advances, we gain a better understanding of how handwashing contributes to infection prevention. There are unresolved issues, some of which continue to spark debate and new research, and investigators a…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Electronic Health Record Alert Improves HCV Screening and Treatment Among Baby Boomers

In a recent study, screening rates for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among baby boomers increased fivefold in the year following implementation of an electronic health record (EHR)-based prompt for primary care physicians. The prompt also led to dr…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Carbohydrates May be the Key to a Better Malaria Vaccine

A malaria parasite (yellow) invading liver cells (pink/red). Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia, have shown for the first time that carbohydrates on the surface of malaria parasites play a critical role in mala…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Humans No Longer Have Ancient Defense Mechanism Against Viruses

Insects and plants have an important ancient defense mechanism that helps them to fight viruses. This is encoded in their DNA. Scientists have long assumed that vertebrates — including humans — also had this same mechanism. But researchers at KU Leuv…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Identify the Most Effective Infection Control Practices in the OR

While hospitals grapple with what operating room (OR) infection control procedures work best, a new study of Texas hospitals has determined two areas that stand out: mandating sterile operating conditions at or close to the wound itself; and tracking i…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Spread of Zika Linked to How Much Time People Spend Outside

Amount of time spent outdoors. A. Amount of time spent outdoors per day in weekdays in the surveyed Miami-Dade County population and the posterior gamma distribution. B. As A, but for weekends. C. As A, but data are taken from the NHPS survey on the U….

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Interventions for Treating Tuberculous Pericarditis

Researchers from South Africa and Canada have carried out a Cochrane review update to assess the safety and effectiveness of corticosteroids for treating tuberculous pericarditis. Tuberculosis (TB) infection of the pericardium, the membrane around the …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Knowledge on How HIV Beats the Body’s Early Immune Response

Dr. Najla Nasr (left) with senior author Tony Cunningham. Courtesy of Westmead Institute for Medical Research In an important step toward eradicating HIV-associated viral reservoirs, researchers at Sydney’s Westmead Institute for Medical Research have …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Presence of Viruses in Semen is Likely More Widespread Than Currently Thought

The detection of Zika virus RNA in the semen of men who have been infected with Zika virus raises the question: How many other viruses persist in semen? To answer this question, researchers searched the scientific literature and found 27 viruses that c…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Antibiotic Identified That Reduces Infection Risk in Young Leukemia Patients

  A patient is pictured with senior author Sima Jeha, MD, a member of the St. Jude Department of Oncology and lead author Joshua Wolf, MD, an assistant member of the St. Jude Department of Infectious Diseases. Courtesy of Seth Dixon/St. Jude Child…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Infants With Congenital Zika Virus Syndrome Suffer Serious Visual Impairment

Involvement of the retina can take several forms. Wide-angle fundus image (RetCam) of the left eye of a child with congenital Zika syndrome showing large chorioretinal scar in the macular region. Courtesy of Journal of AAPOS Although one of the most se…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Gonorrhea Strains Across Europe Becoming More Susceptible to Main Treatment Options

A trend of decreasing cefixime resistance has been observed since 2010 across Europe: in 2015, cefixime resistance was detected in nine countries, compared to 10 in 2014 and 13 in 2013. Courtesy of ECDC According to test results from the annual Europea…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Fish Food for Marine Farms Harbors Antibiotic Resistance Genes

From isolated caves to ancient permafrost, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes for resistance have been showing up in unexpected places. As scientists puzzle over how genes for antibiotic resistance arise in various environments and what risks to h…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Best Tactical Approach to Handling Patients With Concurrent Parasitic and HIV Infection

One of the most common waterborne diseases worldwide is cryptosporidiosis, a parasitic disease affecting the small intestine and possibly our airways. It is a common cause of diarrhea in HIV-positive patients, who are known to have lower immunity. Now,…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Clears Important Hurdle Toward Developing an HIV Vaccine

An international team of researchers has demonstrated a way of overcoming one of the major stumbling blocks that has prevented the development of a vaccine against HIV: the ability to generate immune cells that stay in circulation long enough to respon…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Tulane University Drug is Effective Against Malaria

Dr. Donald Krogstad, senior author and professor of tropical medicine at Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Courtesy of Tulane University/Paula Burch-Celentano Tulane University researchers have developed a new drug that i…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Paper-Based Tuberculosis Test Could Boost Diagnoses in Developing Countries

Diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) early can allow patients to receive the medicine they need and also help prevent the disease from spreading. But in resource-limited areas, equipment requirements and long wait times for results are obstacles to diagnosis a…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Systems Analysis Points to Links Between Toxoplasma Infection and Common Brain Diseases

More than 2 billion people – nearly one out of every three humans on earth, including about 60 million people in the United States – have a lifelong infection with the brain-dwelling parasite Toxoplasma gondii. In the Sept. 13, 2017, issue of Scientifi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Working on Experimental Vaccine for Leishmaniasis

The life cycle of Leishmania parasites in flies and humans. If passes through promastigote and amastigote phases as it spreads. Courtesy of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Parasites that ulcerate the skin, can disfigure the face, and m…

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A Hair-Trigger for Cells Fighting Infection

This is a microscopy image showing collections of mRNA molecules, called RNA granules (green), inside B cells that are altering their genes to produce antibodies. DNA is shown in blue. Courtesy of Dr. Manuel Díaz-Muñoz To fight infections…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Measuring Sepsis Incidence and Trends in U.S. Hospitals Using Clinical Data

Sepsis, the syndrome of life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by infection, is a major cause of death, disability, and cost.  Many studies suggest that the incidence of sepsis is increasing over time, while mortality rates are decreasing.&nbsp…

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In ER, Electronic Alert Helps Detect Severe Sepsis in Children

An electronic alert system helps clinicians quickly do a bedside assessment to identify children with severe sepsis in an emergency department. Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) report on their efforts to rapidly recogni…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Superbugs Gang Up on Us, Fueled by Antibiotic Use, Nursing Home Study Suggests

What’s worse than getting exposed to a kind of bacteria that modern antibiotics can’t kill? Getting exposed to more than one – because they may work together to cause an infection, new research suggests. And trying different antibiotics to control one …

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Household Environment, Not Genetics, Shapes Salivary Microbes

Researchers in the United Kingdom have discovered that the mix of microorganisms that inhabit a person’s saliva are largely determined by the human host’s household. The study, published this week in mBio®, an open-access journal of the American So…

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Research Identifies Causes and Possible Treatments for Deadly Diseases Affecting Children

Each year, more than half a million deaths among children under five years of age around the world are caused by diarrheal diseases — largely due to insufficient access to adequate hygiene, sanitation and clean drinking water. While there are effectiv…

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Storming the Cellular Barricades to Fight Fungi

This figure shows the design of antifungal antibody-recruiting small molecules (ARM-F) targeting chitin, a fibrous substance in the cell walls of fungi. Courtesy of Yale University Yale University scientists have developed a new class of small molecule…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Reveals New Clues to How a Successful HIV Vaccine Could Work

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have made a discovery that could speed efforts to develop a successful HIV vaccine. The scientists found that on the HIV envelope protein, at a site important for viral function, a small group of suga…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Epidemiologic and Clinical Parameters of West Nile Virus Infections in Humans

Clinical syndromes associated with West Nile virus (WNV) infection range from fever to neuroinvasive disease. Understanding WNV epidemiology and disease history is important for guiding patient care and healthcare decision-making. The objective of this…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researcher Examines the Predictors of 3- and 30-Day Mortality in MERS-CoV Patients

The mortality rate of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) patients is a major challenge in all healthcare systems worldwide. Because the MERS-CoV risk-standardized mortality rates are currently unavailable in the literature, Ah…

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Multistate Outbreak of Human Campylobacter Infections Linked to Pet Store Puppies

The Ohio Department of Health, several other states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS) are investigating a multistate outbreak o…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Says Nurses’ Regular Use of Disinfectants is Associated With Developing COPD

Regular use of disinfectants is linked to a higher risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to new research looking at incidence of the disease in more than 55,000 nurses in the U.S. Orianne Dumas, PhD, from INSERM, Vi…

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Asthmatic Children are Being Prescribed Unnecessary Antibiotics

Children with asthma are more likely to be prescribed antibiotics even though there is no evidence that they need them any more than children without asthma, according to research to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congre…

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Respiratory Tract Infections in Young Children Linked to Asthma and Worse Lung Function

Respiratory tract infections in young children are linked to an increased risk of asthma and worse lung function in later life, according to new research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. An international study of 15…

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Study Asserts That Separating Septic and Aseptic Operating Areas is Unnecessary

In Germany, the rule still applies that aseptic and septic and procedure rooms need to be separate; this is a requirement imposed by the Accident Insurance Provider for Hospitals. This means that a surgical procedure involving infected tissue has to be…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Severity of a Parasite’s Virulence Depends on What Time Infection Occurs

Does the time of day matter when our body is infected by a parasite? According to new research from McGill University, it matters a great deal. Our body works differently at different times of the day following our internal clocks. Researchers from McG…

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Blocking Sweet Taste Receptors Can Help Body Fight Off Sinus Infections

Bitter taste receptors in the upper airway are a first line of defense against sinus infections, but their ability to kill harmful toxins and pathogens is blocked when the sweet taste receptors are also stimulated. While glucose and other sugars are kn…

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New Method for Producing Malaria Treatment on a Large Scale

Compared to smallpox or typhoid, malaria is proving one of the most challenging human diseases to eradicate – and so remains a real and constant danger to nearly half the world’s population. Twenty years ago, 2 million people died each year on ave…

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New Insights on Chronic Bronchitis Could Lead to First Diagnostic Test and Better Treatments

This mucus web, secreted by human lung tissue for protection, consists of large spaghetti-like mucin threads and thousands of other proteins. Measuring mucins has diagnostic and prognostic value. Courtesy of Jerome Carpenter/Mehmet Kesimer, UNC School …

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Biomarkers as Predictive of Sepsis as Lengthy Patient Monitoring

Researchers at the University of Illinois worked with physicians at Carle Foundation Hospital in a new study that found one measurement of biomarkers in the blood can predict a patient’s sepsis status as well as monitoring the patient for hours. Pictur…

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Early Immune Response Provides Insight Into Ebola Vaccination

The latest outbreaks of emerging, dangerous pathogens, such as Ebola, MERS-CoV or Zika, emphasise the importance of the rapid development of effective vaccines. However, being able to predict the efficacy of new vaccines is and remains a challenge in v…

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Researchers Help Uncover Mechanism Behind Heart Failure and Mortality in Sepsis

Of the nearly 1 million people in the United States who are affected by sepsis each year, almost one-fifth die. Cardiovascular complications account for approximately 80 percent of those deaths. The heart muscle, weakened by systemic inflammation, is u…

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What Role Do Genome Variations Play in Tuberculosis?

Tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In 2016, this was the most common causative pathogen for death by infectious diseases. Therefore, investigating the biology of infection and disease development is important in the quest to end tube…

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Antibody-Biogel Partnership Can be Stronger Defense Than Previously Thought

Strong molecular bonds between antibodies and biological gels, like mucus, aren’t necessary to catch pathogens as was previously thought, according to new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In fact, rapid and weak interactio…

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Immune and Nerve Cells Work Together to Fight Gut Infections

The intestinal barrier. Color-enhanced image of the intestinal lining, which serves as a barrier and limits dissemination of the microbiota. Courtesy of Drs. Greg Sonnenberg and David Artis, Weill Cornell Medicine. Nerve cells in the gut play a crucial…

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Nursing Home Workers Often Fail to Change Gloves

The failure to change gloves is common among certified nursing assistants, and may be a significant cause of the spread of dangerous pathogens in nursing homes and long-term healthcare settings, according to a new study published in the September issue…

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Honeybees Could Play a Role in Developing New Antibiotics

An antimicrobial compound made by honeybees could become the basis for new antibiotics, according to new research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. No new antibiotics have been discovered for more than 30 years, and some bacteria are becoming i…

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Study Finds Improved Vaccine That Protects Against Nine Types of HPV

Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with almost 300,000 deaths occurring each year. More than 80 percent of these deaths occur in developing nations. The advent of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has s…

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NIH-Funded Study Suggests PrEP Therapy is Safe for Teens

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) network study has confirmed that a combination of two drugs taken daily to reduce the chances of HIV infection among high-risk adults also works well and appears safe in males ages 15 to 17 years. Truvada, a single…

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Drug Candidate May Reduce Spread of the Malaria Parasite

Significant headway has been made in controlling malaria. However, two vexing problems remain: currently available treatments are unable to block transmission of the parasite that causes the disease, and the parasite often becomes resistant to drugs. A…

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Molecular Map Shows How to Disable Dangerous Bioweapon

This photograph depicts the colonial morphology displayed by Gram-negative Francisella tularensis bacteria. Courtesy of CDC/Amanda Moore, Todd Parker and Audra Marsh During World War II, the Soviet Red Army was forced to move their biological warfare o…

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Researchers Develop Lassa Fever Treatment Effective Eight Days After Infection

A collaborative team of scientists, led by a group at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, has successfully protected nonhuman primates against one of the most deadly viruses in the world, Lassa fever, eight days after they became infec…

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The Bacteria Responsible for Legionellosis Modulates the Host Cell Metabolism to its Advantage

Legionella pneumophila (green), the bacterium responsible for severe acute lung disease inside eukaryotic cells. Mitochondrial network in red, nucleus in blue. Courtesy of Institut Pasteur. Intracellular pathogens adopt various strategies to circumvent…

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Gut Microbiota of Larvae Has an Impact on the Mosquito’s Ability to Transmit Human Pathogens

Sampling of mosquito larvae and water from their breeding sites in the urban environment by researcher Laura Dickson during a field mission in Gabon. Courtesy of Institut Pasteur Mosquitoes are holometabolous insects (organisms that go through a comple…

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Navigating the Intersection Where Healthcare Laundry and Infection Prevention Meet

By John Scherberger BS, FAHE, CHESP Editor’s note: This is the first of a series of articles about the role of healthcare laundry in infection prevention. Remember learning intersection safety in driver’s ed? We were warned that intersectio…

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Product Evaluation and Purchasing: Environmental Hygiene-Related Products

ICT invited manufacturers of environmental hygiene-related products to provide instruction on best practices relating to the evaluation of products as well as how to introduce and integrate them into the healthcare environment.  ICT: What are the …

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Industry Driving Surface Compatibility Research and Education

Medical device housings are subject to cracking, crazing and discoloration from some disinfectants that are used to reduce rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs), and this can lead to equipment breakdowns. Surface compatibility with chemical …

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Healthcare Surfaces Summit, a Cutting-Edge Collaboration

By Linda Lybert There are dozens of types, textures, and materials that comprise the surfaces that exist within the healthcare environment. They can be as varied and different as imaginable – from plastic, rubber, textiles, stainless steel, …

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Sterilized Items Must Not Be Touched During the Cooling Process

By Nancy Chobin, RN, AAS, ACSP, CSPM, CFER Q: I am a certified tech and have been for 25-plus years. I have a question that I am hoping that someone can put an answer in writing for me. For whatever reason as of late, the people in my OR think it is ok…

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Using Instrument Air in the Decontamination Area

By Nancy Chobin, RN, AAS, ACSP, CSPM, CFER Q:  I am wondering if there is guidance supporting clean air on the assembly side to blow out lumens. Also, do you have a recommendation for using 70 percent alcohol or sterile water to flush out lumens d…

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Drying is a Critical Phase of the Sterilization Process

By Nancy Chobin, RN, AAS, ACSP, CSPM, CFER Q: We have a dynamic-air removal sterilizer. The load was set for 4 minutes at 270 degrees F. (132 degrees C.) I came back from my break and mistakenly unlocked the door at a few minutes into the exhaust phase…

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Surgeons Create ‘Vacuum’ Procedure to Remove Infected Pacemaker

Dr. David Wilson uses his smartphone to explain the patient’s infected pacemaker wires. Courtesy of Ryan Noone Pacemakers help people live longer, active lives. They’re also often worn for decades at a time. But a pacemaker’s wiring could get infected,…

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Children With Bone, Joint Infection Often Carry the Same Infectious Bacteria in Throat

This photograph depicts the colonial morphology displayed by Gram-negative Kingella kingae bacteria, which was grown on a medium of sheep’s blood agar (SBA), for a 24 hour time period, at a temperature of 37°C. Courtesy of Pete Seidel/CDC The…

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Does Indoor Spraying Help Prevent Dengue?

The Mesocyclops is a predator that eats the dengue mosquito larvae. Courtesy of Department of Foreign Affairs, Flickr The prevention of dengue, the most prevalent mosquito-borne virus in the world, relies heavily on controlling mosquito populations, as…

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Study Finds White Children Receive Antibiotics for Viral Illness at a Higher Rate

White children with viral diagnoses treated in pediatric emergency departments were up to twice as likely to receive antibiotics compared to minority children, according to a study published in Pediatrics. Although viral respiratory tract infections do…

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Zika Virus Kills Brain Cancer Stem Cells

Brain cancer stem cells (left) are killed by Zika virus infection (image at right shows cells after Zika treatment). A new study shows that the virus, known for killing cells in the brains of developing fetuses, could be redirected to destroy the kind …

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New Insights Into Bacterial Toxins

A toxin produced by a bacterium that causes urinary tract infections is related to, yet different in key ways from, the toxin that causes whooping cough, according to new research. The findings, which will be published in the Sept. 8 issue of The Journ…

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Change in Medical Exemptions From Immunization After Elimination of Personal Belief Exemptions

An increase in California in medical exemptions from immunization after elimination of personal belief exemptions suggests that some vaccine-hesitant parents may have located physicians willing to exercise the broader discretion provided by California …

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NIAID Scientists Illuminate Mechanism of Increased Cardiovascular Risks With HIV

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have expanded the understanding of how chronic inflammation and persistent immune activation associated with HIV infection drive cardiovascular disease risk in people living with HIV. People living with H…

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Scientists Find New Evidence About How to Prevent Worsening Pneumonia

Sodium channels in the cells that line the tiny capillaries in our lungs play an important role in keeping those capillaries from leaking and potentially worsening conditions like pneumonia, scientists report. from left, Drs. Supriya Sridhar, Maritza J…

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CDC Urges Early Recognition, Prompt Treatment of Sepsis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has launched Get Ahead of Sepsis, an educational initiative to protect Americans from the devastating effects of sepsis. This initiative emphasizes the importance of early recognition and timely treat…

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Whitepaper: An Approach to Improving the Quality and Consistency of Flexible GI Endoscope Reprocessing

The reprocessing procedure for flexible endoscopes is an intricate multi-step process that requires a significant amount of time and diligence that can vary by endoscope type and manufacturer.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Boarding Procedures, Smaller Cabin Size May Limit Infection on Planes

FSU-led research team uses supercomputer simulations to track spread of disease on commercial airliners. From left, co-PI Sirish Namilae of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Florida State University associate professor of computer science Ashok Sri…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

PolyU Scientist Discovers a Newly Emerged Superbug

Chen Sheng, Professor of PolyU’s Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, discovered a newly emerged superbug, hyper-resistant and hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae. Courtesy of Hong Kong Polytechnic University The Partner State Key Lab…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

FDA Approves First U.S. Treatment for Chagas Disease

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announces it has granted accelerated approval to benznidazole for use in children ages 2 to 12 years old with Chagas disease. It is the first treatment approved in the United States for the treatment of Chaga…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

FDA Approves New Antibacterial Drug

The Food and Drug Administration announces it has approved Vabomere for adults with complicated urinary tract infections (cUTI), including a type of kidney infection, pyelonephritis, caused by specific bacteria. Vabomere is a drug containing meropenem,…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Virus That Causes Mono May Increase Risk of MS for Multiple Races

Like whites, Hispanic and black people who have had mononucleosis, commonly known as mono, which is caused by Epstein-Barr virus, may have an increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in the Aug. 30, 2017, online iss…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers at Queen’s University and Belfast Trust Tackle Meningitis

Meningitis and Meningococcal septicemia (Meningococcal disease) is caused by a deadly bacteria that can kill in hours. Meningococcal disease is notoriously difficult to diagnose as initial symptoms mimic those of common colds. Researchers at Queen&rsqu…

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Study on Inherited Herpesvirus Finds Links to Ancient Humans

An international study of integrated HHV-6 has discovered that a small number of human ancestors, one from about 24,000 years ago, have been responsible for transmitting ancient strains of the virus to individuals today, affecting about a million peopl…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Why Some Listeria Strains Survive Good Food Hygiene Standards

A newly defined ‘stress survival islet’ assures survival of some listeria strains despite high hygiene standards in food production. Courtesy of Institute of Milk Hygiene Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen that colonizes and reproduces on d…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

First Atlas of B-Cell Clones in the Body Forms New Foundation for Infectious Disease Research

A model of the human body showing distinct B cell clonal networks in the gastrointestinal tract. Courtesy of Alexander H. Farley A new “anatomic atlas” of how B cells — the immune system’s producer of antibodies — link up to form networks has been ch…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Drug Breakthrough for Mosquito-borne Virus Outbreaks

Scientists have discovered a way that could help treat severe inflammation from an infectious mosquito-borne disease during outbreaks. A team of researchers led by professor Suresh Mahalingam at Griffith University’s Institute for Glycomics is developi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Antimicrobial Fabrics are Ineffective for Preventing Transmission, Study Shows

Clothing worn by healthcare providers can become contaminated with bacteria, however having nurses wear scrubs with antimicrobial properties did not prevent this bacterial contamination from occurring, according to a study published online in Infection…

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Video: MIT researchers design drone for reading RFID tags

MIT researchers have developed a system that enables small, safe, aerial drones to read RFID tags from tens of meters away while identifying tag location with an average error of about 19 centimeters. The researchers envision that the system could be used in large warehouses for both continuous monitoring, to prevent inventory mismatches, and location […]

Source: http://rfid24-7.com

Study Identifies Genes Linked to Better Immune Response to Flu Vaccine

Yale University experts and their partners in a national research consortium have identified several genes and gene clusters associated with the immune response to flu vaccination. The findings point to the prospect of using genetic profiles to predict…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

GW Researcher Awarded $2 Million to Study Natural Immune Response to HIV

A research team at the George Washington University (GW) School of Medicine and Health Sciences will study the body’s natural defenses against HIV and look for ways to eliminate the infectious HIV reservoirs in the white blood cells of people tak…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

NIH Funds Saint Louis University Research of Possible Treatment for Drug-Resistant TB

Daniel Hoft, MD, PhD, directs Saint Louis University’s Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy & Immunology. Courtesy of Saint Louis University Saint Louis University is leading a multi-national clinical trial of what could become a regimen for dr…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Studies Reveal How Shingles Vaccine Should be Used in Arthritis Patients

New research indicates that the live varicella-zoster vaccine–which is given to protect against shingles–elicits robust immune responses in patients when administered several weeks prior to the start of treatment with the arthritis drug tofacitinib. …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx