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Most Dengue Infections Transmitted In and Around Home

Transmission of the mosquito-borne dengue virus appears to be largely driven by infections centered in and around the home, with the majority of cases related to one another occurring in people who live less than 200 meters apart, new research led by t…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Mosquito Monitoring Has Limited Utility in Dengue Control, Study Finds

Cross-sectional surveys of mosquito abundance carried out in the subtropics and tropics are meant to give researchers an indication of the risk of a dengue virus outbreak in any given area. This type of entomological monitoring, however, is not a good …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

WHO Issues Ethics Guidance to Protect the Rights of TB Patients

New tuberculosis (TB) ethics guidance, issued today by the World Health Organization (WHO), aims to help ensure that countries implementing the End TB Strategy adhere to sound ethical standards to protect the rights of all those affected. TB, the world…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Research Shows Some Viruses Can Infect Even After Major Mutations

Portland State University researchers have found that only about half the genes in a specific virus affecting single cell organisms is needed to infect a host. This means the virus can undergo major mutations without losing its ability to survive and i…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Global Rise of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Threatens to Derail Decades of Progress

The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) threatens to derail decades of progress in controlling the disease, according to a new report in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine published on World TB Day (Mar…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Effective One-Shot Vaccination of Newborns Moves Closer to Reality

Newborns are highly vulnerable to infections and don’t respond optimally to most vaccines because their young immune systems typically mount weak antibody responses. Now, researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital report achieving strong vaccine respons…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Use Parasite’s Internal Clock to Attack Sleeping Sickness

The parasite that causes deadly sleeping sickness has its own biological clock that makes it more vulnerable to medications during the afternoon, according to international research that may help improve treatments for one of Africa’s most lethal disea…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Penn State Develops First of a Kind Model to Research Post-Malaria Epilepsy

A first-of-its-kind mouse model could lead to an understanding of how cerebral malaria infection leads to the development of epilepsy in children and to the prevention of seizures. The model — a way for researchers to simulate the effects of mala…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Biopesticide Could Defeat Insecticide Resistance in Bed Bugs

A fungal biopesticide that shows promise for the control of bed bugs is highly effective even against bed-bug populations that are insecticide resistant, according to research conducted by scientists at Penn State and North Carolina State universities….

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Counties in Southern U.S. States Face Highest Risk of Zika Infections

Researchers have examined where and how transmission of Zika virus is most likely to occur in the contiguous United States. They evaluated two types of transmission risk: sexually and via Aedes aegypti mosquito bites. They looked at predictors of sexua…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Penn AIDS Researcher Receives $16.3 Million From NIAID to Hasten HIV Vaccine Development

Building on earlier work in designing chimeric human-simian immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) that serve as a model of HIV infection of humans, George M. Shaw, MD, PhD, a professor of Hematology/Oncology and Microbiology in the Perelman School of Medici…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Antenatal Screening in Europe: How to Avoid Mother-to-Child Transmission of Infections

Transmission of infections with HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis or rubella from mother to child before and during birth as well as in infancy still occur across Europe, despite existing prevention methods. A new ECDC report outlines the cornerstones for eff…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

States Can Lower Risk of Measles Outbreak by Strengthening Exemption Policies

States with weaker non-medical exemption policies for vaccinations can reduce the likelihood of a measles outbreak 140 to 190 percent by strengthening them, a new study from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus shows. Researchers said the…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Novel Technology Could Provide a Faster, Inexpensive Way to Detect and Monitor Dengue and Zika

Purdue researchers are developing an integrated biosensing platform aimed at detecting and monitoring mosquito-borne diseases faster and cheaper than current methods, to aid in preventing virus outbreaks and their devastating effects.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Vaccine, Improved Treatment are Keys to Control of a Surging HIV Pandemic

Development and widespread use of a vaccine that’s even partially effective against HIV, along with more progress toward diagnosis and treatment, offer the best hopes for turning the corner on a global pandemic that’s still spiraling out of control, re…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Infections During Pregnancy May Interfere With Genes Linked to Prenatal Brain Development

If a mother picks up an infection during pregnancy, her immune system will kick into action to clear the infection – but this self-defense mechanism may also have a small influence how her child’s brain develops in the womb, in ways that are similar to…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Interferon Drug Shows Promise in Treating Ebola

A pilot study of a class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has been shown for the first time to ease symptoms of Ebola patients, while also increasing their survival.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Shortage of Drug to Treat Low Blood Pressure from Septic Shock Associated With Increased Deaths

Patients with septic shock admitted to hospitals affected by the 2011 shortage of the drug norepinephrine had a higher risk of in-hospital death, according to a study published online by JAMA. The study is being released to coincide with its presentati…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

White Paper: RFID in Retail is on the rise

RFID is on the rise. In Kurt Salmon’s first large retail study of RFID in 2014, 34 percent of respondents had either implemented or were piloting RFID. Today, that number has more than doubled to 73 percent. Part of the reason for the significant growth in RFID use is that more and more retailers have […]

Source: http://rfid24-7.com

Study Highlights Risks of Sepsis

A new study from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham analyzing three different methods for characterizing sepsis has helped to illustrate the risk of death or severe illness attributable to the condition. The study, published online …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Microbes Evolved to Colonize Different Parts of the Human Body

As the human species evolved over the last six million years, our resident microbes did the same, adapting to vastly different conditions on our skin and in our mouths, noses, genitalia and guts. A team of Duke University scientists has tracked how thi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Sandia App Prototype Dramatically Cuts Cost, Time for Detection of Zika Virus

Add rapid, mobile testing for Zika and other viruses to the list of things that smartphone technology is making possible. Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a smartphone-controlled, battery-operated diagnostic device that weighs…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

TB/HIV Co-infections Up 40 Percent Across Europe Over the Last Five Years

New data released today by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the WHO Regional Office for Europe ahead of World TB Day show that new tuberculosis (TB) cases and deaths in the 53 countries of the WHO European Region declin…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Primate-Parasite Network Analyses Show How Pathogens Jump From Host to Host

An extensive review of research on wild primate social networks and parasites underscores the importance of super-spreaders, or central individuals that play an outsized role in transmission of a pathogen. Trends in Parasitology published the review, t…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Flu Update: Activity Continues to Decline

According to the CDC’s FluView report for the week ending March 11, 2017 (week 10), flu activity remains elevated, but continues to decline. The 2016-2017 flu season has likely peaked and is now on the decline, however 36 states continue to report wide…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

ASP Submits 510(k) Application for 30-Minute STERRAD Velocity Biological Indicator System

Advanced Sterilization Products (ASP), part of Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, announces that it submitted a 510(k) application to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the ultra-fast STERRAD VELOCITY™ Biological Indicator (…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Healthmark Offers the Magic Touch Magnifier

Healthmark Industries announces the addition of the Magic Touch Magnifier to its optical inspection line. Designed for detailed inspection, the 3.75-inch by 3.75-inch by 1.8-inch Magic Touch has a magnification of 3x and weighs 0.45 pounds. Equipped wi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

No Evidence for Presence of MCR-Producers in Fecal Flora of Healthy People, Primary-Care Patients

The extent of the occurrence of the plasmid-encoded colistin resistance genes mcr-1 and mcr-2 among humans is currently sparsely studied in Western Europe. Zurfluh, et al. (2017) sought to determine the occurrence of MCR-producing Enterobacteriace…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

First Global Guidance for HPV Vaccination for Cervical Cancer Prevention

The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today issued a clinical practice guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for the prevention of cervical cancer. This is the first guideline on primary prevention of cervical cancer that is ta…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CD4+ T-cell Count Useful to Assess Antiretroviral Therapy Response in HTLV-1/HIV Patients

The authors compared the CD4+ T-cell counts and HIV-1 RNA viral loads of 383 patients who were either mono-infected with HIV or co-infected with HTLV-1/HIV. They confirmed that co-infected patients were more likely to have higher CD4+ T-cell counts pri…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Empathy From the Sick May Be Critical to Halting Disease Outbreaks

A little empathy can go a long way toward ending infectious disease outbreaks. That’s a conclusion from researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, who used a networked variation of game theory to study how individual behavior during an outbrea…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Old Target, New Mechanism for Overcoming Tuberculosis Resistance

In strains of tuberculosis that have developed drug resistance mutations, researchers have identified a secondary pathway that can be activated to reinstate drug sensitivity. The rise of drug-resistant tuberculosis poses a serious threat to humans, wit…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

How Gut Inflammation Drives the Evolution of Harmful Bacteria

Inflammation in the gut helps bacterial viruses spread to other strains of bacteria and promotes their success, a new study in mice finds. The results hint that using a vaccine that reduces gut inflammation may be helpful in treating some infections. B…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Offers 10 Ways to Avoid Getting an Infection When Receiving Medical Care

People receiving medical care sometimes develop infections so serious they may lead to sepsis or death. It can happen in any medical facility such as a hospital, outpatient clinic, dialysis center, or long-term care facility. These are called healthcar…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Human Antibody for Zika Virus Appears Promising for Treatment, Prevention

Researchers have determined the structure of a human antibody bound to the Zika virus, revealing details about how the antibody interferes with the infection mechanism — findings that could aid in development of antiviral medications.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

How Do Ebola Virus Proteins Released in Exosomes Affect the Immune System?

Cells infected by the deadly Ebola virus may release viral proteins such as VP40 packaged in exosomes, which, as new research indicates, can affect immune cells throughout the body impairing their ability to combat the infection and to seek out and des…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Biologists Uncover a New Way That Bacteria Lay Siege to Neighboring Cells

Bacteria have evolved some seriously complex strategies to communicate with one another, and the resulting interactions are a delicate balance of cooperation and, in some cases, competition. These intraspecies exchanges take place within contact-depend…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Map Pathways to Protective Antibodies for an HIV Vaccine

A Duke Health-led research team has described both the pathway of HIV protective antibody development and a synthetic HIV outer envelope mimic that has the potential to induce the antibodies with vaccination. “A goal for an HIV-1 vaccine is to induce b…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Fighting MRSA With New Membrane-Busting Compounds

Public health officials are increasingly concerned over methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The bacteria have developed resistance to a number of treatments, even antibiotics of last resort in some cases. Now researchers report in ACS’ …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Hepatitis C Mutations Outrun Immune Systems, Study Shows

Unlike its viral cousins hepatitis A and B, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has eluded the development of a vaccine and infected more than 170 million people worldwide. Now, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that a novel laboratory tool that lets th…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Method for Producing Leading Anti-Malarial Drug

Researchers at Cardiff University have devised a new way of creating a drug commonly used as the first line of defense against malaria around the world. Artemisinin is a drug recommended by the World Health Organization for treatment of all cases of se…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Early Intervention With New Treatment Provides Durable Control of HIV-Like Virus in Primate Model

There are more than 25 drugs to control HIV, yet the virus remains one of the world’s biggest health problems. One of the many challenges with existing therapies is that a dormant version of the virus is always lurking in the background, ready to…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Experimental Malaria Vaccine Provides Durable Protection Against Multiple Strains in Clinical Trial

An experimental malaria vaccine protected healthy subjects from infection with a malaria strain different from that contained in the vaccine, according to a study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The resear…

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Immune Molecule Protects Against Zika Virus Infection in Animal Models

A molecule naturally produced by the immune system protects mice and monkeys against Zika virus infection, an international team of researchers has found. Administering the molecule, called 25-hydroxycholesterol or 25HC, to pregnant mice reduced Zika v…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Ebola Vaccines Provide Immune Responses After One Year, Study Finds

Immune responses to Ebola vaccines at one year after vaccination are examined in a new study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA. The Ebola virus vaccine strategies evaluated by the World Health Organization in response to the 2014-2016 outbreak in…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Develop Technique to Track Yellow Fever Virus Replication

Researchers from Princeton University’s Department of Molecular Biology have developed a new method that can precisely track the replication of yellow fever virus in individual host immune cells. The technique, which is described in a paper published M…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

UTHealth Study Paves the Way for Clostridium difficile Treatment in Pill Form

Frozen and freeze-dried products for fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) are nearly as effective as fresh product at treating patients with Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection, according to researchers at the University of Texas Health Science…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Increased Risk of Post-op Infection When Surgery Closely Follows Epidural Steroid Injection

Research conducted at the University of Virginia suggests that patients may wish to take a one- to three-month break from lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESIs) before undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Why? An increased risk of infectio…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Antibiotics Not Effective for Clinically Infected Eczema in Children

Estimates suggest that 40 percent of eczema flares are treated with topical antibiotics, but findings from a study led by Cardiff University suggest there is no meaningful benefit from the use of either oral or topical antibiotics for milder clinically…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Examine Impact of Community-Acquired Pneumonia on Quality of Life in the Elderly

The sustained health-related quality-of-life of patients surviving community-acquired pneumonia has not been accurately quantified. The aim of the current study by Mangen, et al. (2017) was to quantify differences in health-related quality-of-life…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Elevated Prevalence of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Organisms in HIV-Positive Men

Routes of transmission of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms (MDRGN) are not completely understood. Since sexual transmission of MDRGN might represent a potential mode that has not been noticed so far, this study by Reinheimer, et al. (20…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Identifies New Potential Risk of Zika Virus Transmission in Florida Counties

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a potential risk of Zika virus transmission starting on June, 15, 2016, to present in Miami-Dade County, Florida, that also could affect risk for residents of Broward and Palm Beach co…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Phage Therapy Shown to Kill Superbug

Scientists from the University of Liverpool have shown that phage therapy could offer a safe and effective alternative to antibiotics in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections. Chronic lung infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aerug…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Flu Update: Activity Has Likely Peaked

According to the CDC’s FluView report for the week ending March 4, 2017 (week 9), while flu activity remained elevated for the 12th consecutive week, the season has likely peaked. 39 states are reporting widespread flu activity compared to 43 last week…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Pre-Existing Immunity to Dengue Virus Shapes Zika-Specific T Cell Response

Although Zika and dengue are considered different virus “species,” they are so closely related that the immune system treats Zika just like another version of dengue, report researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology. Thei…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Highly Pathogenic A(H7N9) Virus Mutation Does Not Change Risk to Humans

In February 2017, a new A(H7N9) virus — indicating high pathogenicity in poultry — was detected in three patients connected to Guangdong, China, as well as in environmental and poultry samples. This is an important development to be monitored, howeve…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Georgia State Researcher Awarded $4.1 Million Federal Grant to Develop Drug to Combat Ebola Virus

Dr. Christopher Basler, a professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, director of the university’s Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Microbial Pathogenesis, ha…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

MRI Scans Can Help Spot HIV in the Brain

Scientists at University College London (UCL) have developed a way to use MRI scans to help identify when HIV is persisting in the brain despite effective drug treatment. The study, published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and funded by Wellcome, show…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Nasal Decolonization Using Alcohol Not Antibiotics

Evidence shows decolonization lowers SSI and HAI. New strategy for ICU and OR using alcohol based Nasal Sanitizer® swab is effective without antibiotics or iodine. Read whitepaper. Get Nozin® samples.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Making Resistant Superbugs Sensitive to Antibiotics

New research is paving the way for the development of innovative drugs that restore antibiotic susceptibility in antibiotic-resistant superbugs such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, a main cause of fatal lung and bloodstream infections worldwide. Researchers …

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IHI and NPSF Agree to a Merger to Advance Common Patient Safety Goals

Recognizing that patient safety is a public health issue in need of fresh, robust approaches and constant focus for healthcare systems today, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and the National Patient Safety Foundation (NPSF) announce plan…

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Standard Precautions: Studies Indicate Suboptimal Adherence

Standard precautions (SPs) are one of the cornerstones of infection prevention and control, designed to limit bloodborne pathogen exposures among healthcare workers (HCWs) and halt the transmission of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) to patients…

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The Role of Surveillance in HAI Prevention

Infection surveillance, once the primary task of infection preventionists (IPs), has transitioned over time to assume a more limited place in a massively expanded scope of IP responsibilities.  Infection surveillance data is used to measure succes…

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Healthmark Announces New Hanging Tag

Healthmark Industries announces the addition of a new Hanging Tag to its labeling product line. Manufactured to be used with container systems, the white colored tag is 3.5 inches by 1.9 inches by  0.78 inches. The Hanging Tag features an ideal su…

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Researchers Hone In On When and Where Zika Virus Attacks

The Zika virus attacks tissues in the nervous system, male and female reproductive and urinary tracts, muscles, joints and lymph nodes, and persists for at least 35 days, according to a study conducted in a nonhuman primate model by a multidisciplinary…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Zika Virus May Have Harmful Heart Effects, Research Shows in First Report in Adults

Zika may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 66th Annual Scientific Sessi…

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Researchers Develop Testing Program to Study Potency for Neglected Tropical Disease Vaccines

Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) have developed a way to test recombinant vaccines for their ability to stay effective after years of storage. This is an important next step in the development of a recombinant hookworm vaccine being…

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NASA, ASU Collaboration Develops 3-D Tissue Culture Models to Mimic Human Gut Infections

Vaccines and antimicrobials have done more to transform medicine and extend the average human lifespan than any other scientific breakthrough. Yet infectious diseases remain the world’s No. 1 leading cause of death of children and young adults. Now, wi…

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Patients More Likely to Get Flu Shots When Doctors Make Appointments

Patients are much more likely to get a flu shot if their doctors make the appointment for them, Rutgers researchers have discovered. The study has found that doctors who take a proactive stance and schedule flu shots for patients can dra…

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African-Americans Less Likely to Get Flu Vaccine Than White Americans

Fewer than half of American adults get vaccinated despite strong recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and widespread availability of free and low-cost vaccines. Furthermore, African-Americans are less likely to get …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Novel Antibiotic Combination Therapy Overcomes Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Researchers have known that part of the challenge in treating penicillin-resistant infections lies in understanding the way bacteria inactivate penicillin antibiotics. The enzymes that do this, beta-lactamases, chop up the antibiotics rendering them us…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Reveal Structure of Potential Leishmaniasis Vaccine

Leishmaniasis, caused by the bite of a sand fly carrying a Leishmania parasite, infects around a million people a year around the world. Now, making progress toward a vaccine against the parasitic disease, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropic…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

APIC Announces Recipient of Graduate Student Award for Infection Prevention

The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) announces the recipient of the APIC Graduate Student Award (AGSA). An award of $5,000 was provided for a one-year period (January through December 2017). The recipient, Mary…

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NIH-Funded Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group Details Progress, Challenges

In June 2013, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), provided $2 million in funding to establish an Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) to develop, prioritize and…

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Multi-State Outbreak of Listeriosis Linked to Soft Raw Milk Cheese Made by Vulto Creamery

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections (listeriosis). List…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Suggests Health Agencies Need Clear Rules for Disclosing Foodborne Illness Outbreaks

There’s an ongoing debate among public health officials about how quickly they should notify the public about foodborne illness outbreaks, and how much information should be shared. Is it better to tell people as early as possible, or could that create…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Says Outbreak of North American Avian Influenza A in Poultry Poses Low Risk to People

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says it is working closely with USDA APHIS and the Tennessee Department of Health to minimize any human health risk posed by the avian influenza outbreak in Lincoln County, Tennessee. This includes i…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Is It a Bad Cold or RSV?

Kids get colds – sometimes, lots of them. But when runny noses and coughs turn into troubled breathing, the problem could indicate RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus. RSV hits the youngest the hardest, often producing bronchiolitis or pneumonia …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Asthmatics are Less Able to Fight Off Flu

People with asthma are likely to have worse symptoms when they get the flu because they have weaker immune systems, new University of Southampton research has shown. A study led by the university’s Dr Ben Nicholas  and published in the Journal of …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Cross-Species Jumps May Play Unexpectedly Big Role in Virus Evolution

Tanglegrams of rooted phylogenetic trees for each virus family. Courtesy of Geoghegan JL, et al. (2017)   On occasion, a virus may jump from one host species to another and adapt to the new host. Such cross-species transmission happens more often …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Yellow Fever in the Americas: Current Outbreak Warrants a Close Watch

The unusually large outbreak of yellow fever now occurring in rural Brazil deserves careful attention by world health authorities, notes Anthony S. Fauci, MD, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), one of the Nat…

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Exploring a New Complication From an Emergent Tickborne Parasite

Babesiosis is a rare — but increasingly common — disease spread by ticks. After a bite from an infected tick, microscopic malaria-like parasites are transmitted into the host where they can infect and destroy red blood cells, causing nonimmune hemoly…

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Key Recommendations Can Be Used to Shape Outbreak Preparedness by First Responders

Preparedness is considered essential for healthcare organizations to respond effectively to outbreaks. In the current study Belfroid, et al. (2017) sought to capture the views of first responders on what they consider key recommendations for high-…

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Newer Medications Can Cure HCV Infections

A new analysis reveals a dramatic transformation in the care of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) as more effective and tolerable medications have become available. In an analysis of all HCV antiviral treatment regimens (N=107,079) initiat…

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Testing for Hepatitis C Virus Remains Low Among Baby Boomers

A brief report appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine looks at testing rates for hepatitis C virus (HCV) two years after the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended it for all baby boomers, and finds rates ar…

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Parental Concerns Reduce Uptake of Child Flu Vaccine

The first study investigating parental attitudes toward the UK’s child flu vaccine has found concerns about safety and side effects may negatively influence uptake, and recommends that public health messages need to be reinforced. Led by King’s College…

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Common Cold Can Be Surprisingly Dangerous for Transplant Patients

The common cold is a major source of annoyance for most of us, but new research has found that the most prevalent respiratory infection can be far worse than a stuffy nose for one sector of the population — bone marrow transplant patients. These vulne…

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CSU Chemists Create Tests to Detect Presence of Water- or Food-Borne Bacteria

Katherine Boehle, a graduate student in Chuck Henry’s lab at Colorado State University, holds an electrochemical test strip that can detect harmful bacteria in water. Courtesy of Henry Lab/Colorado State University   Borrowing concepts from medica…

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Decreasing Antibiotic Use Can Reduce Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms

Reducing antibiotic use in intensive care units by even small amounts can significantly decrease transmission of dangerous multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs), according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epide…

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Self-Persuasion App Motivates Low-Income Moms to Protect Teens Against Cancer-Causing HPV

As health officials struggle to boost the number of teens vaccinated against the deadly human papillomavirus, a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, found that self-persuasion works to bring parents on board. Currently public health ef…

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Deadly Raccoon Roundworm Can Infect Humans Without Symptoms, Study Finds

A deadly raccoon parasite that can cause severe neurological problems in infected hosts has been popping up in the South, and seven new cases of human infection in the U.S. have been documented in the last two years alone. Although this “raccoon …

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Researchers Map Clonorchiasis Risk Across China

Clonorchiasis, a neglected tropical disease usually acquired by eating undercooked freshwater fish, affects an estimated 15 million people around the globe. More than 85% of cases are concentrated in China. Now, researchers have produced high-resolutio…

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Longer Hospital Stays Might Reduce Readmissions From Post-Acute Care Facilities

More than 25 percent of Medicare beneficiaries who are admitted to the hospital are sent to a post-acute care facility (a health facility like a rehabilitation or skilled nursing center used instead of a hospital) after being discharged. However, more …

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Rebecca Minkoff handbags will be IOT-enabled by this summer

Last year RFID solutions provider Avery Dennison and Internet of Things platform EVRYTHNG announced that they plan to introduce 10 billion items of connected clothing over the next three years in its Born Digital campaign. Luxury retail brand Rebecca Minkoff is continuing on its tech-enabled journey as a fashion brand, this time introducing smart tags to […]

Source: http://rfid24-7.com

Skin Testing, Computerized Support Tool Can Improve Antibiotic Use in Hospital Inpatients

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) investigators have developed two approaches to increasing the use of penicillins and cephalosporins – highly effective antibiotics that are not as problematic as many alternati…

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Scientists Discover New Variant on Resistance Gene

Polymyxin antibiotics are used as a last resort to treat certain multidrug resistant bacteria. A team of investigators in China has discovered a new variant on a well-known gene that causes resistance to polymyxins and others. More troubling, the gene …

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Researchers Find Combo Therapy Stops Antibiotic Drug Resistance

McMaster University researchers have found a new way to treat the world’s worst infectious diseases, the superbugs that are resistant to all known antibiotics. The discovery of an effective combination therapy has the potential to change medical …

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Zika Virus in Canadian Travelers More Severe Than Expected

A new study sheds light on the acquisition and features of Zika virus in Canadian travelers, indicating it was as commonly confirmed as dengue in people returning from the Americas and the Caribbean but more severe than expected, according to a new stu…

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CDC Flu Update: Increasing Number of Influenza B Viruses Detected

According to the CDC’s FluView report for the week ending Feb. 25, 2017 (week 8), flu activity remained elevated. Also, CDC reported six additional flu-associated pediatric deaths for the 2016-2017 season. The proportion of people seeing their healthca…

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US Endoscopy Announces Full Market Release of Four New VIA Procedure Kits

US Endoscopy announces the expansion of its portfolio of VIA® procedure kits. The four new procedure kit configurations include the supplies needed to begin a GI endoscopy procedure as well as two of the newest care and cleaning products – th…

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