RSS Feed Disclaimer
Some of the articles presented on this Web site are accessed through RSS feeds from third-party sources that are not necessarily part of Technologies Solutions Group (TSG). While we try to select appropriate feeds to prevent objectionable content from being displayed, the presence of any article does not indicate endorsement or recommendation by TSG. All articles are copyright of their respective authors.

Lyme Disease Researchers Seek Consensus as Number of Cases Grows

Scientists have built a large body of knowledge about Lyme disease over the past 40 years, yet controversies remain and the number of cases continues to rise. In the United States, reported cases of Lyme disease, which is transmitted from wild animals …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Flu Update: Levels of Flu-Like Illness Below the National Baseline for the First Time This Season

According to the CDC’s FluView report for the week ending April 15, 2017 (week 15), flu activity decreased in the United States. Levels of flu-like illness are now below the national baseline for the first time this season since early December.  W…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Patients With Drug-Resistant Malaria Cured by Plant Therapy Developed at WPI

When the standard malaria medications failed to help 18 critically ill patients, the attending physician in a Congo clinic acted under the “compassionate use” doctrine and prescribed a not-yet-approved malaria therapy made only from the dried leaves of…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

BD to Acquire Bard for $24 Billion

BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), a leading global medical technology company, and C. R. Bard, Inc., a medical technology leader in the fields of vascular, urology, oncology and surgical specialty products, announced today a definitive agreement unde…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

WHO Pushes for Prevention on World Malaria Day

At an event on the eve of World Malaria Day in Nairobi, the World Health Organization (WHO) called today for accelerated scale-up of efforts to prevent malaria and save lives. In sub-Saharan Africa, which shoulders 90 percent of the global malaria…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

NIH Funds Seven International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, today announced approximately $9 million in first-year funding, subject to availability, for seven malaria research centers around the world. …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Research Sheds Light on Treating Bloodstream Infections With Fewer Side Effects

Patients with bloodstream infections could avoid treatment with a combination of antimicrobial therapies if they are given the right drug as early as possible and if they are classified as at low risk of death. This would reduce the risk of adverse sid…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Drug-Resistant Bacteria in Patients’ Urine or Stool Raise Risk of Drug-Resistant Sepsis

People who have recently been found to have drug-resistant bacteria in their urine or stool samples have a greatly increased risk of developing a bloodstream infection that is also resistant to certain antibiotics, according to a study presented at the…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Test Can Identify Bacteria With Resistance to Colistin

New research suggests it is possible to quickly and accurately diagnose some the most dangerous and drug-resistant types of bacterial infections, using equipment already owned by most hospitals. Bacteria have been gradually evolving to become resistant…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Malaria Sickening Thousands in U.S. and Racking Up Millions in Healthcare costs, Study Finds

Although transmission of malaria was wiped out in the United States decades ago and infections are falling in parts of the developing world, malaria hospitalizations and deaths in the U.S. appear to be far more common than generally appreciated as a st…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Tiny ‘Cages’ Could Keep Vaccines Safe at High Temperatures

Vaccines and antibodies could be transported and stored without refrigeration by capturing them in tiny silica ‘cages,’ a discovery which could make getting vital medicines to remote or dangerous places much easier, cheaper and safer. Vaccines and many…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Recommendation Against Inhaled Flu Vaccine is Good — for Now

Recent federal recommendations against offering the inhaled nasal influenza vaccine due to lack of effectiveness could lead to more flu illness in the U.S. if the inhaled vaccine becomes effective again or if not having the choice of the needle-less va…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Canadian Guideline Recommends Against Screening for Hepatitis C in Adults Not at Increased Risk

The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends against screening for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) in adults at low risk in a guideline published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). “Given the lack of direct evidence that ma…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Antiviral Treatment During Pregnancy Reduces HBV Transmission From Mother to Child

An analysis of published studies indicates that the antiviral drug tenofovir given to pregnant women in the second or third trimester can help prevent mother-to-child transmission of the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Universal vaccination of newborn babies …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Simulation Training Helps Parents of Children with Cancer Improve Central-Line Care in Home

Infections from a central line in children with cancer can be life-threatening. Today, with most cancer care taking place in the home, it is critical for parents to learn to care for central lines and prevent central line-associated bloodstream infecti…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Impact of CDI on Health Service is Equivalent to an Additional 10,670 Bed Days Annually

Data released at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) 2017 demonstrate the impact of CDI on the health service amounts to 10,670 bed days over a year, the equivalent to a fully occupied 30 bed ward, with …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Atomic-Level Motion May Drive Bacteria’s Ability to Evade Immune System Defenses

A study from Indiana University has found evidence that extremely small changes in how atoms move in bacterial proteins can play a big role in how these microorganisms function and evolve. The research, recently published in the Proceedings of the Nati…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Develop Novel Flu Test to Speed Up Respiratory Treatment

Doctors and researchers in Southampton have developed a novel way of using a swab test which can rapidly diagnose flu and other viral infections in patients with severe respiratory conditions – resulting in shorter courses of antibiotics and less…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Fecal Microbiota Transplants Improve Cognitive Impairment Caused by Severe Liver Disease

A study presented today found that fecal transplantation of bacteria from one healthy donor into patients that suffer from hepatic encephalopathy (decline in brain function due to severe liver disease), is safe and improves cognitive function compared …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Investigational Dose of Oral Interferon-Free Treatment Can Cure Hepatitis C in Children

A study presented today that evaluated an investigational dosage of once-daily ledipasvir 45 mg/sofosbuvir 200 mg (LDV/SOF) in children aged six to 11 years infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), found that 99 percent of children (n=89/90) had…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Blood Donor Screening for Hepatitis E Reveals Incidence is Higher Than Previously Reported

Results from a study presented today found that the incidence of HEV RNA in asymptomatic blood donors from Germany is higher than previously reported. The study, presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2017 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, s…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

WHO’s Global Hepatitis Report Sets Baseline to Eliminate Viral Hepatitis by 2030

The World Hepatitis Alliance today welcomes the publication of the first-ever Global Hepatitis Report by the World Health Organization (WHO). The report comes as a follow-up to WHO’s Global Strategy on Viral Hepatitis, which set a goal of eliminat…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Outside OR is Responsible for Majority of In-Hospital Antimicrobial Use

The prophylactic use of antimicrobial agents to prevent infections in non-surgical situations has hardly been investigated, according to Deelen, et al. (2017), who investigated the extent, indications and appropriateness of antimicrobial prophylax…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Oral Antibiotic Prophylaxis is Key Measure to Reduce OS-SSI Rate in Colon and Rectal Surgeries

Organ-space surgical site infections (SSI) are the most serious and costly infections after colorectal surgery. Most previous studies of risk factors for SSI have analyzed colon and rectal procedures together. The aim of the study by Gomila, et al…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Newborns Get Infection Protection, Not Just Digestion, From Gut Bacteria

Hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide die every year from infections that ravage their digestive systems – including those caused by Salmonella and E. coli bacteria. Millions more get sick. Could the difference in survival come not from their…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Bacteria Used to Fight Antimicrobial Contamination of Soil and Water

One of the most widely used antimicrobial products in use since 1964, triclosan, is also one of the top 10 environmental contaminants in rivers – possibly disrupting the endocrine systems of wildlife and causing toxic effects to their reproduction and …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Share New Details on the Rise of Babesiosis on Long Island

Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health report elevated levels of a pathogen responsible for the tick-borne disease babesiosis in Suffolk County, New York, where rates are the h…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Research Uncovers Vital Insights Into CMV Infection

At-risk patients, such as those with HIV or transplant recipients, could benefit from potentially life-saving study carried out by a University of Surrey-led group of international researchers. The research, led by professor Vince Emery, professor of t…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Campylobacter, Salmonella Led Bacterial Foodborne Illnesses in 2016

Campylobacter and Salmonella caused the most reported bacterial foodborne illnesses in 2016, according to preliminary data published today in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. CDC’s Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New EASL Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Management of Hepatitis B Virus

The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) today published its revised Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) on the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The CPGs, which will also be presented in a session at The International …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Inhaled Steroids May Increase Pneumonia Risk in People With Asthma

Use of inhaled corticosteroids was linked with an increased risk of pneumonia in a study of individuals with asthma. In the study of 152,412 asthma patients (of whom 1928 had a pneumonia event during follow-up), current use of inhaled corticosteroids w…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Weapon in the Fight Against Antibiotic Resistance is Discovered

Scientists at St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre and the University of Manitoba have developed a drug that combats two of the top 10 “priority pathogens” recently defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as antibiotic-resistan…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Uncover Mechanism Allowing Bacteria to Survive the Human Immune System

Researchers have uncovered molecular details of how pathogenic bacteria fight back against the human immune response to infection. Scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Institut de Biologie Structurale (CEA-CNRS-UGA, France) have identi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Fungi Have Enormous Potential as New Antibiotics

Fungi are a potential goldmine for the production of pharmaceuticals. This is shown by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, who have developed a method for finding new antibiotics from nature’s own resources. The findings, which could prov…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

European Countries Restrict Access to Lifesaving Treatment for Hepatitis C

Data presented today demonstrate that there are considerable restrictions in the reimbursement of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy across European countries, particularly with respect to the severity of liver fibrosis (scarring of the liver) and p…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Periodic Model Predicts the Spread of Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is among the most common vector-borne illnesses in North America, Europe, and some parts of Asia. A spirochete bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi causes the disease, and blacklegged ticks (Ixodes scapularis) are responsible for the majo…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Could Yellow Fever Rise Again?

Many people might not have heard of the Aedes aegypti mosquito until this past year, when the mosquito, and the disease it can carry – Zika – began to make headlines. But more than 220 years ago, this same breed of mosquito was spreading a …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Defective HIV Proviruses Hinder Immune System Response and Cure

Researchers at Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities report new evidence that proteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specif…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Unprecedented Progress Against Neglected Tropical Diseases, WHO Reports

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports remarkable achievements in tackling neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) since 2007. An estimated 1 billion people received treatment in 2015 alone. “WHO has observed record-breaking progress toward bring…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Identify the Tactic Dengue Virus Uses to Delay Triggering Immune Response

For the human body to mount an immune response to a viral infection, host cells must identify the viral invader and trigger a signaling pathway. This signal then prompts the immune system to attack and subdue the pathogen. Using the dengue virus (DENV)…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Bacteriophages Act as Natural Drugs to Combat Superbugs

Viruses that specifically kill bacteria, called bacteriophages, might one day help solve the growing problem of bacterial infections that are resistant to antibiotic treatment. Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the Michael E. DeBakey Vetera…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Explains Extraordinary Resilience of a Deadly Bacterium

Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells can survive dramatic changes in the water content of their environment. Courtesy of Çetiner et al., 2017   Researchers at the University of Maryland have identified how the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aerug…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Lyme Disease Imposes Significant Cost on the Northeast U.S.

As people across the northeastern U.S. begin venturing back into the outdoors with the arrival of spring, they will make 1 billion fewer trips than they otherwise would have if Lyme disease didn’t exist, a new Yale study concludes. In an analysis publi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Common Antibiotic Azithromycin Not Linked to Increased Risk of Abnormal Heartbeat

The commonly used antibiotic azithromycin is not linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia, an often life-threatening rapid, irregular heartbeat, according to a large study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Azithromy…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Examines Effectiveness of Steroid Medication for Sore Throat

In patients with a sore throat that didn’t require immediate antibiotics, a single capsule of the corticosteroid dexamethasone didn’t increase the likelihood of complete symptom resolution after 24 hours, and although more patients taking the steroid r…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Chemical High-Level Disinfection Documentation is Essential

Q: In reviewing our manual high-level disinfection (HLD) records, I noted that on several occasions, the temperature of the solution did not reach the manufacturer’s recommended temperature. The technician did not notify the supervisor of this pr…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

AAMI Foundation Launches Initiative to Address Complexity of Healthcare Technology

Don’t let complexity get in the way of safety in healthcare. That is the “simple” goal of a new coalition—spearheaded by the AAMI Foundation—that is tackling the challenge of the burgeoning development and use of complex h…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Engineer Human-Germ Hybrid Molecules to Attack Drug-Resistant Bacteria

Inspired by viruses that attack and kill bacteria, researchers at Rockefeller University have created an entirely new weapon against disease-causing bacteria that shows great promise for treating drug-resistant infections. In work described in the Proc…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

UNC Researchers Identify a New HIV Reservoir

HIV cure research to date has focused on clearing the virus from T cells, a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. Yet investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

South Carolina Hospitals See Major Drop in Post-Surgical Deaths With Safety Checklist

South Carolina saw a 22 percent reduction in post-surgical deaths in hospitals that completed a voluntary, statewide program to implement the World Health Organization Surgical Safety Checklist. The findings of the five-year project between the South C…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Flu Update: 72 Pediatric Flu Deaths Reported This Season

According to the FluView report for the week ending April 8, 2017 (week 14), flu activity decreased but remained elevated in the United States. While the 2016-2017 flu season has peaked, 18 states continue to report widespread flu activity and addition…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Children’s Hospital Colorado Combats Antibiotic Resistance with ‘Handshake Stewardship’

Recent research from Children’s Hospital Colorado has shown the effectiveness of a unique type of antimicrobial stewardship program in the fight against antibiotic (antiviral, antifungal and antibacterial) resistance. The research examined the impact a…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

WHO Director-General Addresses the Last Decade in Public Health Efforts

Margaret Chan, director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO) has issued the following statement regarding a report, “Ten Years in Public Health 2007-2017,” that chronicles the evolution of global public health over the decade that she has ser…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Bacterial ‘Supermachine’ Reveals Streamlined Protein Assembly Line

There are many processes that take place in cells that are essential for life. Two of these, transcription and translation, allow the genetic information stored in DNA to be deciphered into the proteins that form all living things, from bacteria to hum…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Virus Fragments Detected in Species Other Than Zika’s Known Primary Vector

In a recent test of Asian tiger mosquitoes collected in Brazil, researchers found fragments of Zika virus RNA, raising concerns that it may be carried by species other than Zika’s known primary vector, the yellow fever mosquito. The research does not c…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Unravel the Mechanism of Skin Barrier Formation

Scientists have identified the gene responsible for generating acylceramide, the key lipid in forming the skin barrier that protects us from pathogens, allergens and other harmful substances. This finding could prove crucial in developing medicines for…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Lice and Bacteria are Partners in Parasitism

Head lice have been stigmatized, quickly conjuring images of infested school children and parents combing through their hair. This social stigma reaches many of the estimated 14 million people who are annually infested in the U.S. alone. However, these…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

HHS Sponsors New Zika Diagnostic Test, Boosting National Testing Capacity

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) today announced an $8.9 million agreement with Siemens Healthineers, a Tarrytown, N.Y.-based company to further develop a Zik…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Radical Increase in Water and Sanitation Investment Required to Meet Targets

Countries are not increasing spending fast enough to meet the water and sanitation targets under the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), says a new report published by the World Health Organization (WHO) on behalf of UN-Water – the United Natio…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Survey of Chagas Disease in U.S. Confirms It is a Major Public Health Challenge

A study of almost 5,000 Latin American-born residents of Los Angeles County found that 1.24 percent tested positive for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that can cause life-threatening heart damage if not treated early. Chagas disease is one …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

NIH Study of Ebola Patient Traces Disease Progression and Recovery

Analysis of daily gene activation in a patient with severe Ebola virus disease cared for at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2015 found changes in antiviral and immune response genes that pinpointed key transition points in the response to in…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

A Big-Picture Look at the World’s Worst Ebola Epidemic

An international effort to analyze the entire database of Ebola virus genomes from the 2013-2016 West African epidemic reveals insights into factors that sped or slowed the rampage and calls for using real-time sequencing and data-sharing to contain fu…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Tackling Ebola, From Supportive Care to Vaccines in Clinical Development

A new study reports the first detailed description of the day-by-day immune responses observed during the course of a patient’s progression through, and recovery from, Ebola virus disease (EVD). During the EVD outbreak that struck West Africa from…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

NIH Scientists Advance Understanding of Herpesvirus Infection

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections last a lifetime. Once a person has been infected, the virus can remain dormant (latent) for years before periodically reactivating to cause recurrent disease. This poorly understood cycle has frustrated scientists …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Report Explores How to Improve Speed, Effectiveness of Clinical Trials During an Epidemic

Mobilization of a rapid and robust clinical research program that explores whether investigational therapeutics and vaccines are safe and effective to combat the next infectious disease epidemic will depend on strengthening capacity in low-income count…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

NSU Researchers Studying How to Disrupt Bacteria to Better Treat Infections

Bacteria are everywhere. And despite widespread belief, not all bacteria are “bad.” However, to combat those that can cause health issues for humans, there has been an over-reliance on the use of antibiotics — so much so, that many of them are now pro…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

First Live-Attenuated Vaccine Candidate Completely Protects Against Zika Infection

The first live-attenuated Zika vaccine still in the development stage completely protected mice against the virus after a single vaccination dose, according to new research from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Instituto Evandro …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Mosquito Egg Hunt: Many Culex Species Prefer Alternatives to Standing Water

The conventional wisdom about where many mosquitoes lay their eggs–in standing water–is not always wise. Research into a diverse group of mosquitoes shows that many, if not most, regularly lay their eggs on a variety of surfaces, and in a surprising …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Texas Biomed Part of Research Efforts to Screen and Develop Ebola Virus Drug

Dr. Robert Davey, a scientist at Texas Biomedical Research Institute, is part of a team of researchers working to find new drugs that will stop Ebola virus from growing inside infected cells. Dr. Christopher Basler, a professor in the Institute for Bio…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Call for a More Comprehensive Tracking System for MRSA Infections in the U.S.

Kavanagh, et al. (2017) conducted a review of epidemiological studies on the incidence of MRSA infections over time, along with an analysis of data available for download from Hospital Compare (https://data.medicare.gov/data/hospital-compare). The…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC/WHO Ebola Guidelines Could Put Sewer Workers at Risk, Researchers Say

Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that guidelines for safe disposal of liquid waste from patients being treated for the Ebola virus might not go far enough to protect water treatment workers from being exposed. I…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Approach Makes Cells Resistant to HIV

Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to tether HIV-fighting antibodies to immune cells, creating a cell population resistant to the virus. Their experiments under lab conditions show that these resistant cells can quickl…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

UTHealth Microbiologists Discover Possible New Strategy to Fight Oral Thrush

An antimicrobial protein caused a dramatic reduction in the creamy white lesions associated with oral thrush in a preclinical study, report microbiologists with McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHeal…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Anthrax Spores Use RNA Coat to Mislead Immune System

Researchers from Harvard Medical School have discovered that the body’s immune system initially detects the presence of anthrax spores by recognizing RNA molecules that coat the spores’ surface. But this prompts an unfavorable immune respon…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Legionella Bacteria’s Escape Route Revealed

The precise mechanism used by Legionella bacteria to escape the body’s defenses has been unpicked in intricate detail and is described for the first time in the journal eLife. The study reveals a potential new therapeutic approach to tackle infection b…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Viral Fossils Reveal How Our Ancestors May Have Eliminated an Ancient Infection

Scientists have uncovered how our ancestors may have wiped out an ancient retrovirus around 11 million years ago. Retroviruses, which include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), are abundant in nature. Unlike other viruses, which do not usually leave a…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

El Nino Shifts Geographic Distribution of Cholera Cases in Africa

Cholera cases in East Africa increase by roughly 50,000 during El Niño, the cyclical weather occurrence that profoundly changes global weather patterns, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. The findings, researc…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Examine Susceptibility of Acinetobacter Isolates to Antiseptics and Disinfectants

This study by Lanjri, et al. (2017) aims to assess the susceptibility of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates to the antiseptics and disinfectants commonly used, and to the non-approved product. This is a prospective study carried out from February to…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

First Recipients of Joint Commission Medication Compounding Certification Announced

Supporting efforts to ensure patients receive safe and high quality compounded medications, Genesys Regional Medical Center in Grand Blanc, Mich., has become the first hospital—and Home I.V. Care, Inc. in Madison Heights, Mich., has become the fi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

IP Stakeholders Series: Risk Management

The relationship between the infection prevention and risk management departments at a hospital is a crucial one, and it provides the foundation upon which patient safety and quality improvement efforts can be built.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Patients at Hospital-Based Primary Practices More Likely to Get Unnecessary Tests and Services

Patients with common conditions such as back pain, headaches and upper respiratory infections are more likely to receive tests and services of uncertain or little diagnostic or therapeutic benefit—so-called low-value care—when they seek tre…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists One Step Closer to Cracking the Mystery of Bacterial Adaptation to Antibiotics

An international team including researchers from MIPT’s Laboratory for Advanced Studies of Membrane Proteins have proposed an explanation of the way bacteria process external signals. By identifying the detailed structure of the protein complex used by…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Flu Update: Season Has Peaked but 24 States Continue to Report Widespread Activity

According to the CDC’s FluView report for the week ending April 1, 2017 (week 13), flu activity decreased but remains elevated in the United States. While the 2016-2017 flu season has peaked, 24 states continue to report widespread flu activity and sig…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

FDA Approves Two Hepatitis C Drugs for Pediatric Patients

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announces it has approved supplemental applications for Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) and Harvoni (ledipasvir and sofosbuvir) to treat hepatitis C virus (HCV) in children ages 12 to 17. Harvoni and Sovaldi were previously …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Finds Reduced Susceptibility to Chlorfenapyr and Bifenthrin Among Some Tested Bed Bug Samples

Pest management professionals battling the ongoing resurgence of bed bugs are wise to employ a well-rounded set of measures that reduces reliance on chemical control, as new research shows the early signs of resistance developing among bed bugs to two …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Research Reveals an Evolutionary ‘Arms Race’ Between Virus and Host

Imaging CoE scientists have solved a 40-year old mystery and shed light on an evolutionary arms race played out between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the immune system. Human CMV, also known as human herpesvirus 5, infects more than 50 percent of adults wo…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Programmed Proteins Might Help Prevent Malaria

Despite decades of malaria research, the disease still afflicts hundreds of millions and kills around half a million people each year — most of them children in tropical regions. Part of the problem is that the malaria parasite is a shape-shifter, mak…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Develop Mouse That Could Provide Advance Warning of Next Flu Pandemic

Researchers in Germany have developed a transgenic mouse that could help scientists identify new influenza virus strains with the potential to cause a global pandemic. The mouse is described in a study, “In vivo evasion of MxA by avian influenza …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Explore Association Between Reduced HPV Infection and Genetic Variations in Western Asia

New research provides an insight into why cervical cancer is less common in certain regions of the world even though they may have limited screening and fewer or no prevention programs. Though the preliminary findings, published early online in Cancer,…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Assisting Investigation of Animal Material Found in Packaged Salad

Experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are working with the Florida Department of Health and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to support an investigation of a dead bat that was found in a packaged salad purchased from a…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Reuters Reports on Use of Chlorhexidine Products, Industry Ties Related to Infection Control Science

The news service Reuters is reporting on relationships between industry and researchers in the infection control space, relating to ties that “have helped propel the popularity of chlorhexidine products in hospitals and other healthcare settings where …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Smelling the Risk of Infection: Influence of Parasitism on the Evolution of Social Behavior

Humans, like most non-human primates, are social beings and profit in many respects from the benefits of a community. However, their closeness to conspecifics is an opportunity for pathogens and parasites to infect new hosts. It is therefore advantageo…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

New Breed of Supermolecule Removes Pharmaceuticals from Water

A University of Surrey academic is leading research that has found an effective, environmentally friendly way to monitor and remove pharmaceuticals from water. The research involves the detection and removal of pharmaceuticals in or from water, as cont…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Tru-D SmartUVC Helps to Reduce C. diff Infections at Chesapeake Regional Healthcare

With the help of a fleet of germ-eliminating UV robots, Chesapeake Regional Healthcare (CRH) experienced a marked decrease in its Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection rates. After participating in a study on UV disinfection and seeing significant …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Diversey Care Acquires Daylight Medical UVC Disinfection Portfolio

Sealed Air’s Diversey Care division today announced it has acquired the UVC disinfection portfolio of Cleveland-based Daylight Medical, a manufacturer of innovative medical devices.  The portfolio acquired includes UVC disinfectant technolog…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Financial Math May Help Build a Better HIV Vaccine

What do particle diffusion in liquids and stock price prediction have to do with building a better HIV vaccine? According to University of Iowa microbiologist Hillel Haim, you can apply concepts from the first two to predict the evolution of HIV surfac…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

NIH-Funded Research to Explore Impact of Economic Stability on HIV Infection

The University of Chicago Medicine’s Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry and Innovation (Ci3) in Sexual and Reproductive Health has launched a research initiative aimed at reducing HIV infection and transmission among vulnerable youth of color, includ…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Detect Protein That Increases Effectiveness of Vaccines

Researchers have discovered a protein they believe would help make vaccinations more effective and provide protection from other diseases such as cancer. The findings, which appear online in Scientific Reports, allows for greater understanding of how v…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

World Immunization Week 2017 Marks Halfway Point in Global Vaccine Action Plan

World Immunization Week – celebrated in the last week of April – aims to promote the use of vaccines to protect people of all ages against disease. Immunization saves millions of lives and is widely recognized as one of the world’s mo…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

WHO Prequalifies First Generic Active Ingredient for Hepatitis C Medicines

For the first time, the World Health Organization (WHO) has prequalified a generic active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) for hepatitis C – sofosbuvir. Sofosbuvir is an essential ingredient for new, highly effective medicines to treat hepatitis C…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx