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Study Raises Possibility of Naturally Acquired Immunity Against Zika Virus

In this photo, Zika virus infection kills non-human primate epithelial cells. White gaps in the image show where Zika virus has disrupted a layer of healthy cells. Researchers analyzed infection in these cells to test the infectivity of the Zika virus,…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

How the Immune System Identifies Invading Bacteria

Using cryo-electron microscopy, researchers have revealed the structure of a multi-protein complex called the NAIP5-NLRC4 inflammasome, which helps identify invading bacteria. Courtesy of Nicole Haloupek/UC Berkeley/Howard Hughes Medical Institute The …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Stopping the Dengue Threat

First author of the study published in PLOS One, Rokeya Akter from QUT’s Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI), said overseas and interstate travelers posed a significant threat in the transmission of dengue across Australia. “Dengue is …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Identify Hormone for Treating Sepsis

Meera Nair (left) and Jessica Jang in the Nair laboratory at the UCR School of Medicine. Courtesy of Ross French, UC Riverside. A research team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside has discovered that the human prote…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

TSRI and PATH Collaboration Provides Blueprint for Design of a Next-Generation Malaria Vaccine

Researchers from the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and PATH’s Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI) have shed light on how the human immune system recognizes the malaria parasite though investigation of antibodies generated from the RTS,S malaria vaccin…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Identifies Potential Cell Receptors to Reduce Antibiotic Resistance

The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections. The pathogen is resistant to many antibiotics so treating those infections, particularly in patients with compromised immune systems, is difficult. A new study f…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

How Natural Killer Cells Conquer Klebsiella

The inappropriate or excessive use of antimicrobial agents in past decades has propelled the emergence and spread of multidrug resistant microbial pathogens. According to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and the European Medicines…

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Fashion retailer Misako relies on RFID for international expansion

Spanish fashion retailer Misako is deploying RFID technology at more than 200 of its stores and a distribution center in Europe. By using Nedap’s !D cloud RFID software, Misako hopes to raise its inventory accuracy to over 98 percent. The retailer has identified having full transparency of its store stock levels as an essential part […]

Source: http://rfid24-7.com

Text Message Reminders Increase Rates of Influenza Vaccination

Text message reminders are a low-cost effective strategy for increasing rates of influenza vaccination. A randomized controlled trial in Western Australia identified patients who were at high risk of serious influenza illness and had a mobile phone num…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

UTEP Team Advances in Developing Vaccine for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

Katja Michael, PhD, Eva Iniguez, Rosa Maldonado, PhD, and Igor Almeida, PhD. Courtesy of J.R. Hernandez/UTEP Communications A research team at the University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing an effective human vaccine for cutaneous …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Single-Room ICU Design Contributes to the Reduction of Cross-Transmission of MDROs

Cross-transmission of nosocomial pathogens occurs frequently in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the introduction of a single room policy resulted in a decrease in transmission of multidrug-resistant (MDR) ba…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control Offers Guidance on CRE Measures

Infections with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are increasingly being reported from patients in healthcare settings. They are associated with high patient morbidity, attributable mortality and hospital costs. Patients who are “at-r…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Developing a New Vaccination Strategy Against AIDS

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), there are currently more than 36 million people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and a further 2.4 million become infected every year. Despite all the medical treatment success again…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Model Sheds New Light on Pathogen Cooperation

New approaches are needed to control the spread of epidemic diseases, according to the developers of a new model of the way pathogens can “cooperate.” Their study examined the ways two pathogens work together, finding that cooperativity between contagi…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Infectious Diseases Experts Train Frontline Clinicians to Research Effective Antibiotic Use

Today, healthcare professionals from across the U.S. are gathering to further national and hospital-based research to improve the use and effectiveness of antibiotics. The Antimicrobial Stewardship Research Workshop will prepare healthcare professional…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Combined Resistance to Multiple Antibiotics is a Growing Problem in the EU

On the occasion of the 10th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance, as well as its guidance on prevention and control of carbapenem-…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

CDC Flu Update: Overall Activity is Low but Increasing

According to the latest FluView report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza activity remained low overall in the United States, but is increasing. However, six states and Guam reported regional flu activity…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Making Mosquitoes Self-Destruct

CRISPR/Cas9-mediated disruption of genes associated with cuticle pigment caused mosquitoes to turn from black to yellow, and disruption of genes associated with eye pigment caused eye color to change from black to white. Courtesy of UC Riverside. Resea…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Shape-Shifting Agent Targets Harmful Bacteria in the Stomach

At normal tissue pH (left), the polymer is inactive and does not kill bacteria. But in an acidic environment (right), it disrupts bacterial membranes to kill H. pylori in the stomach. Courtesy of Jianjun Cheng, University of Illinois A new shape-shifti…

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Parents Help Shape How Much Pain Preschoolers Feel After Vaccination

York University professor Rebecca Pillai Riddell in the Faculty of Health, York Research Chair in Pain and Mental Health and senior author of the paper, and her team found that not only is a parent’s behavior during vaccinations critical to a child’s p…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Three Decades of Responding to Infectious Disease Outbreaks

Ebola virus isolated from in November 2014 from patient blood samples obtained in Mali. The virus was isolated on Vero cells. Courtesy of NIH Soon after his appointment in 1984 as director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (N…

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In the Fight Against Viral Infection, Spelling Counts

This is a human cell (green) infected with HIV (red). Courtesy of Rockefeller University For millions of years, humans and viruses have engaged in a constant tug of war: as our cells evolve new ways to defend us from our viral enemies, these pathogens …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

American Academy of Dermatology Offers Tips on What to Do if You Get Scabies

Scabies is a common skin condition caused by the human itch mite. People get scabies when the mite burrows into the top layer of their skin to live and feed. When the skin reacts to the mite – which is so small that you would need a microscope to…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Compares Sexual Practices Among Older and Younger HIV-Infected Women

A new study that compared HIV-positive women over 50 years of age with their younger HIV-infected cohorts found that while the older women were less likely to be sexually active and to report condomless sex with a male partner, those who were sexually …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

World Antibiotic Awareness Week Kicks Off

During World Antibiotic Awareness Week, Nov. 13-19, 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) and partners will reach out to the general public, health professionals, governments, farmers, veterinarians, the food and feed industry and others via a soci…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Researchers Make Superbug Breakthrough

Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast together with the University of Vienna have discovered that treatment for the antibiotic resistant bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae could lie within our bodies’ natural defenses. Multidrug resistance …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Annual Influenza Vaccination Does Not Prevent Natural Immunity

Earlier studies have suggested that having repeated annual influenza vaccination can prevent natural immunity to the virus, and potentially increase the susceptibility to influenza illness in the event of a pandemic, or when the vaccine does not “match…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Reducing the Burden of Neglected Tropical Diseases Requires Investments in Basic Research

International support for measures to prevent neglected tropical diseases has resulted in public health gains, but eliminating these debilitating conditions will require significant investments in basic research, argues Dr. Peter Hotez in a new article…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Fatty Molecule in Human Blood Controls Malaria Parasites’ Decision to Leap to Mosquitoes

Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research te…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Cholera Repeatedly Traveled Out of Asia to Cause Epidemics in Africa and Latin America

Cholera has repeatedly traveled out of Asia to cause epidemics in Africa and Latin America, an international research team has found. Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Institut Pasteur in France, and collaborators from across the worl…

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Scientists Discover New Mechanisms That Bacteria Use to Protect Themselves From Antibiotics

Antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria evolve mechanisms to withstand the drugs which are used to treat infections. The team of experts at the University of Birmingham’s Institute of Microbiology and Infection focused their research on E. coli, wh…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Dengue Immunity Can Protect Against Zika Virus

Zika virus has spread to many countries where dengue virus is endemic. Courtesy of La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology Manifestations of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection differ drastically. Sometimes they are catastrophic, most notably when they c…

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Study Says HPV Vaccine Means Women Only Need Three Cervical Screens in a Lifetime

Women may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study published in the International Journal of Cancer. The Cancer Research UK-funded team from Queen Mary U…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Unravel Likely Causes of Blood Vessel Leakage in Severe Dengue

Dengue virus NS1 (bottom left, right) triggers vascular leakage in mice. Courtesy of Kalani Ratnasiri A protein secreted by cells infected with dengue virus can cause dangerous leakage of fluid from blood vessels, and new research published in PLOS Pat…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Cellphone-Based Microscope Leads to Possible Strategy for Treating River Blindness

River blindness, or onchocerciasis, is a disease caused by a parasitic worm found primarily in Africa. The worm (Onchocerca volvulus) is transmitted to humans as immature larvae through bites of infected black flies. Symptoms of infection include inten…

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HPV Vaccine Also Prevents Uncommon Childhood Respiratory Disease, Study Suggests

The vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings suggest t…

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New Model Reveals Possibility of Pumping Antibiotics Into Bacteria

Researchers in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Biochemistry have discovered that a cellular pump known to move drugs like antibiotics out of E. coli bacteria has the potential to bring them in as well, opening new lines of research in…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Extra Bite of Blood Transforms Asian Tiger Mosquito From Poor to Potent Spreader of Zika Virus

The invasive Asian tiger mosquito now rapidly spreading in parts of the United States and Europe may have been significantly underestimated as a potential source of Zika and dengue virus infections — and for one simple reason: they were underfed, acco…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Outlines Perfect Storm Leading to Colombia’s Antibiotic Resistance Epidemic

The nearly simultaneous emergence of a gene responsible for producing carbapenemases — enzymes that kill the most powerful antibiotics used against life-threatening, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections — coupled with the introduction of a b…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Bacteria May Help Babies’ Digestive Tracts More Than Suspected, Scientists Find

Some of the first living things to greet a newborn baby do a lot more than coo or cuddle. In fact, they may actually help the little one’s digestive system prepare for a lifetime of fighting off dangerous germs. But these living things aren&rsquo…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Discover How Helicobacter pylori Causes Gastric Cancer

Gastric cancer is one of the five most fatal types of cancer. According to the statistics of the World Health Organization (WHO), about 750,000 patients die each year after developing the disease. The main cause is thought to be the bacterium Helicobac…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Biological Consequences of Climate Change on Epidemics May be Scale-Dependent

Conventional thinking holds that current climate warming will increase the prevalence and transmission of disease. However, a recent study led by professor Zhang  Zhibin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and professor Nils Christian Stenseth of t…

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Texas Biomedical Research Institute Tests Promising New Drug for Hepatitis B

Research at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) on the campus of Texas Biomedical Research Institute helped advance a new treatment now in human trials for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Testing at SNPRC provided proof th…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Breakthrough in Malaria Breathprinting Could Develop ‘Electronic Nose’ to ‘Smell’ Disease

Scientists have discovered that people with malaria exhale a distinctive “breathprint,” insights they have used to develop a new breath test which was highly successful in diagnosing malaria in a group of African children, according to a new study pres…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Inhibiting the Interaction of Key Proteins Can be an Effective Strategy to Kill Bacillus Bacteria

In an article published in Nature Communications on October 3, a group of scientists from Brazil and France describes a new strategy that could be useful to treat infection by drug-resistant pathogens. The project, supported by the São Paulo Res…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Scientists Make Significant Breakthrough on Superbug-Killing Antibiotic Teixobactin

Scientists working to develop a game-changing new antibiotic have made a significant advance towards creating commercially viable drug treatments by producing two simplified synthetic versions of the substance which are just as potent at killing superb…

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Web-Based Social Media Intervention Can Positively Influence Parental Vaccine Behaviors

Pregnant women who received vaccine information through an interactive website monitored by a clinical expert were more likely to vaccinate their children than those who did not use the web resource, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published tod…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Group B Streptococcus Infection Causes and Estimated 150,000 Stillbirths and Infant Deaths

An estimated 1 in 5 pregnant women around the world carry Group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteria which is a major, yet preventable, cause of maternal and infant ill health globally. These are the findings of a new research supplement published in the jou…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Asymptomatic Infection Helps Norovirus to Spread in Indonesia

Norovirus is the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in humans. A Japanese research team has shown that norovirus is significantly present in the stools of healthy volunteers in Indonesia who are asymptomatically infected with the virus. This su…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Shows Electric Bandages Can Fight Biofilm Formation, Antimicrobial Resistance

An electric bandage. Courtesy of Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Researchers at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown – for the first time – that special bandages using weak electric fields to disrupt bacterial biofilm infe…

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ACP Says Patient Safety Must be Improved in Office-Based Practice Setting

More must be done to improve patient safety in the outpatient setting, said the American College of Physicians (ACP) in a new policy paper released today. Patient Safety in the Office-Based Practice Setting offers a set of recommendations aimed at…

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Study Provides Clues to Body’s Defense Against Candida albicans

Image of the fungus Candida albicans on the surface of a skin cell that is in the process of growing into its filamentous form. Courtesy of Bernhard Hube, University of Jena, Germany An international team led by researchers at the University of Pittsbu…

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Shifting Bacterial Communities in the Stomach May Influence Cancer Risk

Different changes to the microbial community of the stomach may explain why related conditions are associated with different risk levels and types of gastric tumor, according to a new study in PLOS Pathogens. Courtesy of Ed Uthman via Flickr Different …

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The Microbiome of an Occupied Patient Room

By Sue Barnes, RN, CIC, FAPIC A foundational premise of infection prevention science is that contaminated environments increase the risk of transmission of healthcare associated infections, including those caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Livestock-Associated MRSA Found Among MRSA From Humans

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) survey results show more frequent detections and geographical dispersion of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) in humans in the EU/EEA since 2007, and highlight the public health and v…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Study Shows Pros, Cons for Strategy to Create Universal Flu Vaccine

Flu shot season is here. But as you head to the doctor’s office or pharmacy to get vaccinated, scientists are working to make this yearly ritual a thing of the past. Researchers around the world, including at the University of Rochester Medical Center …

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Slide Show: Protect Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus

The CDC offers tips for prevention of RSV infection.

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Rutgers Study Links Frequent Salon Visits to Dermal and Fungal Symptoms in Clients

A recent study by researchers at the Rutgers School of Public Health found that clients who frequent hair and nail salons have more instances of dermal and fungal symptoms, as compared to clients who use the same services less frequently. Although seve…

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Ohio Hospitals Make Great Strides in Reducing Sepsis Mortality

By Mike Abrams One summer day in Thornville, Ohio, Denise Bauer was talking with her husband, Rick Cochran, on the phone and could tell he was in pain and confused. A few hours later he seemed fine as he relaxed in a recliner, but his wife, a nurse, ca…

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Slide Show: Take 3 Actions to Fight the Flu

The CDC provides flu-prevention tips, including recommending a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.

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CSIC Scientists Design New Molecules Capable of Destroying Resistance to Conventional Antibiotics

These are superbugs in laboratory. Courtesy of Andres Diaz/CSIC A team led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) has made an important breakthrough in the battle against superbugs and their resistance to multiple drugs. Scien…

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UGA, Sanofi Pasteur Develop New Broadly Protective Vaccines for H3N2 Influenza

A collaborative research and development partnership between researchers at the University of Georgia and Sanofi Pasteur has resulted in the identification of a vaccine candidate that protects against multiple co-circulating strains of H3N2 influenza i…

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IDSA Launches Antimicrobial Stewardship Centers of Excellence Program

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) announces the first recipients of its Antimicrobial Stewardship Centers of Excellence (CoE) designation: Providence Saint John’s Health Center of Santa Monica, Calif. and Summa Health of Akron, Oh…

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4-in-1 Flu Shot May Mean Lifelong Protection Against Influenza

Eric Weaver (right), an assistant professor in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and research team members Brianna Bullard (center) and Amy Lingel (left). Courtesy of  Craig Chandler/University Communication/…

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Mexican Doctors Safely Reuse Donated Pacemakers After Sterilization

Mexican doctors have safely reused donated pacemakers after sterilization, shows a study presented at the 30th Mexican Congress of Cardiology. The findings create the possibility for patients to receive a pacemaker who otherwise could not afford one. T…

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Madagascar Plague: Mitigating the Risk of Regional Spread

A WHO team monitor plague surveillance efforts at a seaport in Seychelles together with the country’s Ministry of Health. Seychelles has not had any confirmed cases of plague but is increasing preparedness given its proximity to Madagascar and the stro…

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Halyard Health Announces Sale of S&IP Business to Owens & Minor

Halyard Health, Inc. announces it has entered into a definitive agreement with Owens & Minor, Inc. to sell its Surgical and Infection Prevention (S&IP) business for $710 million. S&IP provides healthcare supplies and solutions that target t…

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Study Suggests Pregnant Women Should be Tested More Than Once for the Presence of Zika

Molecular tests to detect Zika virus, which enable identification of the pathogen’s genetic material in body fluids, such as blood, urine, semen and saliva during the acute phase of infection, have been used routinely in prenatal checkups for pregnant …

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Vanderbilt Study Shows Azithromycin Overprescribed for Childhood Pneumonia

A combination of two antibiotics is often prescribed to treat community-acquired pneumonia in children but a JAMA Pediatrics study is now showing that using just one of the two has the same benefit to patients in most cases. Vanderbilt University Medic…

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Survey Finds 4 in 10 Healthcare Professionals Work While Sick

A new study suggests that healthcare professionals (HCPs) should heed to their own advice: stay home when sick. Some four in 10 HCPs work while experiencing influenza-like illness (ILI), according to findings published in the November issue of the…

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Solving of a Decade-Long Mystery Could Help in Fight Against TB

A false color scanning electron microscopy image of Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Courtesy of Dr. Julian Thorpe of the University of Sussex and Dr. Simon Waddell of the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Scientists have solved a decade-old mystery that cou…

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Tracking Mosquitoes With Your Cellphone

A researcher recording the buzzing of mosquitoes in a lab. Courtesy of Kurt Hickman/Stanford News Service It’s a sound that can keep even the weariest among us from falling asleep: the high-pitched whine of a mosquito. This irritating buzz already make…

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Strong Maternal Antibodies for HIV are Ineffective for Protecting Infants From HIV

HIV-positive mothers who possess a strong neutralizing antibody response may be more likely to pass the virus on to her infant through breast feeding. In addition, infants born to mothers with a strong antibody response are significantly more likely to…

Source: http://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/RSS-Feeds/news-and-articles.aspx

Close to 3 Million People Access Hepatitis C Cure

On the eve of the World Hepatitis Summit in Brazil, WHO reports increasing global momentum in the response to viral hepatitis. A record 3 million people were able to obtain treatment for hepatitis C over the past two years, and 2.8 million more people …

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Genome Scientists Use UK Salmonella Cases to Shed Light on African Epidemic

This is a digitally colorized transmission electron micrograph of Salmonella Typhimurium ST313 cells. Courtesy of Siân Owen and Rocío Canals Scientists at the University of Liverpool and Public Health England have used Salmonella genome da…

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‘First-Person View’ of Pathogen Transmission and Hand Hygiene

Healthcare workers’ hands are the foremost means of pathogen transmission in healthcare, but detailed hand trajectories have been insufficiently researched so far. Clack, et al. (2017) developed and applied a new method to systematically doc…

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How Flu Shot Manufacturing Forces Influenza to Mutate

The L194P egg-adaptive mutation dramatically increases the motility of the major epitope on the hemagglutinin of influenza H3 viruses. Red: high motility; white: medium motility; blue: low motility. Courtesy of Wilson Lab According to a new study from …

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Cochrane Review Examines the Effectiveness and Side Effects of Mefloquine

Researchers from Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM) Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group publish two systematic reviews this week about the safety of mefloquine (Lariam) for preventing malaria in travelers. “Mefloquine is at least as effective …

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WHO Report Emphasizes Urgent Need for Greater Political Commitment to End Tuberculosis

Global efforts to combat tuberculosis (TB) have saved an estimated 53 million lives since 2000 and reduced the TB mortality rate by 37 percent, according to the Global TB Report 2017, released by the World Health Organization (WHO) today. Despite these…

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Zika Virus Infects the Developing Brain by First Infecting Cells Meant to Defend Against It

A false color micrograph shows microglia cells (green) infected by the Zika virus (blue). Courtesy of  UC San Diego Health Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Brazil, report that the Zika vi…

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Driving Drug Resistance Out of Fungi

This image shows multicolored diploid Candida albicans fungi growing on an agar plate with red-colored colonies indicating that two copies of a marker gene have been effectively deleted by the gene drive. Courtesy of Wyss Institute at Harvard Universit…

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The Americas Lead in the Vaccination of Pregnant Women Against Influenza

The Region of the Americas is a leader in vaccinating pregnant women against influenza, a public health problem that for future mothers, newborns, and other high-risk populations can mean severe disease, complications, and hospitalization. In all, 32 o…

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Substantial Decline in Global Measles Deaths, but Disease Still Kills 90K Annually

Measles vaccination. Courtesy of the WHO In 2016, an estimated 90,000 people died from measles – an 84% drop from more than 550,000 deaths in 2000 – according to a new report published today by leading health organizations. This marks the f…

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NIH Study Identifies New Targets for Anti-Malaria Drugs

The deadliest malaria parasite needs two proteins to infect red blood cells. Courtesy of NIH The deadliest malaria parasite needs two proteins to infect red blood cells and exit the cells after it multiplies, a finding that may provide researchers with…

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Malaria Parasite in the Americas is More Genetically Diverse Than Previously Thought

The populations found in the Americas of Plasmodium vivax, one of the main human malaria parasites, are as genetically diverse as those found in Southeast Asia, where malaria transmission is much more frequent. Because P. falciparum, the predominant sp…

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New Molecule Shows Promise in HIV Vaccine Design

An artist’s rendition of HIV (foreground). The knobs (purple) covering the virus are sugar-protein molecules, including gp120, that shield the rest of the virus (pink). Courtesy of National Cancer Institute Researchers at the University of Maryland and…

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Study Identifies the Mechanism Bacteria Use to Attach to Surfaces

Most of our knowledge of bacteria comes from the study of bacteria swimming around in liquid but there is a growing consensus that how bacteria interact physically with each other and with surfaces is crucial to understanding their behavior. A new stud…

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Close Look at Killer T-Cell Activity Could Yield New Approach to Tackling Antibiotic Resistance

In a study that could provide a roadmap for combatting the rising threat of drug-resistant pathogens, researchers have discovered the specific mechanism the body’s T cells use to kill bacteria. University of Michigan researchers, in collaboration with …

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Princeton Scientists Investigate Latent Viruses

Worldwide, 4 in 5 adults are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV), say researchers. But most of those infected don’t show symptoms like cold sores because the virus infection is “latent” or “silent” — sleeping — within the nervous syste…

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Getting Ahead of the Next Pandemic: Is the World Ready?

When a deadly mystery illness was detected in Liberia in April 2017, first responders were on the ground within 24 hours. Through the Ministry of Health’s quick action and collaboration with global partners, the cause of the outbreak was identifi…

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Flu Forecasting Tool Uses Viral Evolution to Make Earlier Predictions

Each year, public health officials monitor the spread of influenza to identify which flu strains need to go into that year’s vaccines and where outbreaks will occur. But it can be difficult to predict how bad a particular flu season will be until…

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Cloth Caps More Effective Than Disposable Caps at Preventing Contamination in the OR

One of the first studies testing the effectiveness of different operating room (OR) head coverings in preventing airborne contamination has found that surgeon’s caps that expose small amounts of the ears and hair are not inferior to the bouffant-style,…

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Outpatient Antibiotics Raise Risk for Acquiring CDI in the Community

Outpatient antibiotic use is a primary risk factor for acquiring Clostridium difficile infection in the community, reinforcing the need for appropriate prescribing in this setting, a new study published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases confirms. The f…

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Microbiologists Contribute to Possible New Anti-TB Treatment Path

As part of the long effort to improve treatment of tuberculosis (TB), microbiologists led by Yasu Morita at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have for the first time characterized a protein involved in making a glycolipid compoun…

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Imported Candy at the Top of Contaminated Food List in California

Following a state law mandating testing, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) issued more alerts for lead in candy than for the other top three sources of food-borne contamination combined, according to the first analysis of outcomes of th…

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Bacterial Toxins are Made in the Gut

You get an infection, you are given penicillin — and then you could get hemorrhagic diarrhea. This rare but extremely unpleasant side reaction can be related to the enterotoxin tilivalline produced by a regular intestinal bacterium. Austrian scientist…

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Genetic Variability of Helicobacter pylori Complicates Efforts to Develop an Effective Vaccine

Helicobacter pylori is a widespread bacterial pathogen that infects the lining of the stomach, where it can cause ulcers and even cancer. As a new study shows, its genetic variability complicates efforts to develop an effective vaccine. The bacterium H…

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Antibiotics Derived From a ‘Molecular Pencil Sharpener’

In this depiction of a “molecular pencil sharpener,” the pentagons are chemicals that make a “warhead” toxic once it is “sharpened” by Tld – bacterial proteins. The proteins are inactive until a “leader” – the pencil wood surrounding the gr…

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Researchers Find Triclosan and Other Chemicals Accumulate in Toothbrushes

A team of environmental chemists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by Baoshan Xing, who has long studied how polymers take up chemicals they contact, report in the current issue of Environmental Science & Technology that triclosan, an …

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New Method Helps Rule Out Heart Valve Infection

A risk assessment system developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden shows which patients, with a certain type of streptococcal bacteria in the blood, need to be examined for a heart valve infection – a serious condition requiring prolonged m…

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